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The Legend of Sleepy Hollow (Graphic Novel)

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Please note that this is the graphic novel adaptation of Sleepy Hollow. If you're looking for the short story, go here. This is Bo Hampton's 1993 Legend of Sleepy Hollow, a faithful adaptation of Washington Irving's tale surrounding the ghostly inhabitants of Tarrytown, New York around the time of the American Revolution. The cast of characters is headed up by the Headless Please note that this is the graphic novel adaptation of Sleepy Hollow. If you're looking for the short story, go here. This is Bo Hampton's 1993 Legend of Sleepy Hollow, a faithful adaptation of Washington Irving's tale surrounding the ghostly inhabitants of Tarrytown, New York around the time of the American Revolution. The cast of characters is headed up by the Headless Horseman himself. This edition boasts new covers and 16 pages of new material, including numerous preliminary sketches of scenes and characters.


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Please note that this is the graphic novel adaptation of Sleepy Hollow. If you're looking for the short story, go here. This is Bo Hampton's 1993 Legend of Sleepy Hollow, a faithful adaptation of Washington Irving's tale surrounding the ghostly inhabitants of Tarrytown, New York around the time of the American Revolution. The cast of characters is headed up by the Headless Please note that this is the graphic novel adaptation of Sleepy Hollow. If you're looking for the short story, go here. This is Bo Hampton's 1993 Legend of Sleepy Hollow, a faithful adaptation of Washington Irving's tale surrounding the ghostly inhabitants of Tarrytown, New York around the time of the American Revolution. The cast of characters is headed up by the Headless Horseman himself. This edition boasts new covers and 16 pages of new material, including numerous preliminary sketches of scenes and characters.

30 review for The Legend of Sleepy Hollow (Graphic Novel)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bhuvanesh

    Every aspect of the book is complex: intricate plot, sophisticated language, detailed narration. The author has done a good job by making the story short. The detailed narration brings forth a good imagination. I'm citing a block below which impressed me a lot. I profess not to know how women's hearts are wooed and won. To me they have always been matters of riddle and admiration. Some seem to have but one vulnerable point, or door of access; while others have a thousand avenues, and may be captu Every aspect of the book is complex: intricate plot, sophisticated language, detailed narration. The author has done a good job by making the story short. The detailed narration brings forth a good imagination. I'm citing a block below which impressed me a lot. I profess not to know how women's hearts are wooed and won. To me they have always been matters of riddle and admiration. Some seem to have but one vulnerable point, or door of access; while others have a thousand avenues, and may be captured in a thousand different ways. It is a great triumph of skill to gain the former, but a still greater proof of generalship to maintain possession of the latter, for man must battle for his fortress at every door and window. He who wins a thousand common hearts is therefore entitled to some renown; but he who keeps undisputed sway over the heart of a coquette is indeed a hero. The author has left us to interpret the conclusion, where there are many possibilities for what had happened to Ichabod Crane: he could have disappeared to nearby territory or he could have killed. But the story clearly implies that Brom Bones was the Headless Horseman in disguise(his efficiency to ride a steed and his hearty laugh at the mention of the pumpkin[later mentioned at the end]).

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alexa SOF2014

    This creative and magical novel tells the story about Ichabod Crane who is a poor school teacher and only works for 10 dollars a day. This tale takes place around the time of the American Revolution near Tarrytown, New York. Ichabod sleeps in a student's house and does very little work around the house. He falls in love with the beautiful Katrina Van Tassel. She is a wealthy daughter of a Dutch farmer. He goes to dinner one night at her mansion. At the dinner party everyone is talking about a he This creative and magical novel tells the story about Ichabod Crane who is a poor school teacher and only works for 10 dollars a day. This tale takes place around the time of the American Revolution near Tarrytown, New York. Ichabod sleeps in a student's house and does very little work around the house. He falls in love with the beautiful Katrina Van Tassel. She is a wealthy daughter of a Dutch farmer. He goes to dinner one night at her mansion. At the dinner party everyone is talking about a headless horseman who stalks the countryside at night. One man, Brom Bones, a rival of Ichabod, tells how he and the horseman were in a race. Brom was winning but the horseman flew off in a burst of fire. On his way home from the party Ichabod encounters the headless horseman. He rides off in a hurry but feels something hit his head. The next day Ichabod's horse returns but their was no sign of Ichabod except his hat and a smashed pumpkin. I think I would find it very difficult to live during the time of the American Revolution. The narrator of this tale, Diedrich Knickerbocker, uses sarcasm very well in telling the reader he has an excellent singing voice and looks like the bird, the crane. During the time ghost stories and legends must have been very popular. I think I would have been very scared hearing these stories. I would give this famous tale 5 stars! It was very well written and kept my attention. We will never know what really happened to Ichabod Crane.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Erika B. (SOS BOOKS)

    Perfect scary story! I love the part where it says ..."and he would have passed a pleasant life of it, in despite of the Devil and all his works, if his path had not been crossed by a being that causes more perplexity to mortal man than ghosts, goblins, and the whole race of witches put together, and that was-a woman." Poor Ichabod Crane!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dusty

    What a great Halloween story! Makes me crave deep autumn.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ronald

    Washington Irving certainly had a firm grasp on language, and he flaunts it here. Still, the flowery description and excruciating attention given to the scenery, vegetation, the food on tables, etc. gets old fast. This is already a short book as it is and said flowery descriptions make up the majority of its length; not much actually happens in terms of story. In fact, the entire plot (which is almost nonexistent) could probably be told in 5 or so pages if we didn't stop to smell the roses so of Washington Irving certainly had a firm grasp on language, and he flaunts it here. Still, the flowery description and excruciating attention given to the scenery, vegetation, the food on tables, etc. gets old fast. This is already a short book as it is and said flowery descriptions make up the majority of its length; not much actually happens in terms of story. In fact, the entire plot (which is almost nonexistent) could probably be told in 5 or so pages if we didn't stop to smell the roses so often, and at such great length. I'm all for digression in a book as long as it's interesting (as in philosophical ramblings on the human condition or some such); but I can only stare at a rock or a bale of hay for so long before I'm ready to move on. Not really a book that I'd recommend, but if you're curious about it then by all means, check it out. It's really not horrible, the writing is quite good, it's just far too tedious for my liking. In all honesty, this is one of those rare instances in which I hold the modern movie adaptation in much higher esteem than the original writing. Sure, the Tim Burton film took great liberties with it and added much that wasn't originally there, but if they hadn't then there simply wouldn't have been enough material for a feature film.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Clint Keller

    Oh the story of the headless horseman, what better story to read while trying to scare kids or enjoy a nice halloween weekend. The classic horror story created by Washington Irving has been twisted and tweak countless amounts of times to creat movies, shows, and even other books. But there is nothing like the original, and it is evident when reading "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow". A story which until the end is just about a man, Icabod Crane, who tries to win a young woman's hand in marriage. But Oh the story of the headless horseman, what better story to read while trying to scare kids or enjoy a nice halloween weekend. The classic horror story created by Washington Irving has been twisted and tweak countless amounts of times to creat movies, shows, and even other books. But there is nothing like the original, and it is evident when reading "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow". A story which until the end is just about a man, Icabod Crane, who tries to win a young woman's hand in marriage. But as the story comes close to ending, Icabod runs into a dark figure, the headless horseman of Sleepy Hollow. This short story was very entertaining since before I read this book the only version I knew was from the movie which took a completely different approach. This book, as previously stated, would be perfect around halloween time. I really enjoyed the pictures throughout the book, they were neatly drawn and kept the story very interesting. I would suggest to reading this book to a younger audience but to no one else.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

    I saw the film Sleepy Hollow a couple of weeks ago and I found it very funny and enjoyable (I mean, I like anything by Tim Burton and anything with Johnny Depp in it, so it wasn't such a big surprise) and I decided to read the short story that inspired the movie. It was a nice and very short read, and even though the director developed and altered the story a bit, I can understand the appeal it posed. [image error] Did I say that I'm totally in love with Johnny Depp? :D

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tasha

    Well I must say I expected something different. Still it was quite an interesting read and I liked the rather unusual portrayal of the main character who was nothing less tan a hero. A nice read for Halloween.

  9. 4 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    A scary tale from America's past, but sadly, much of it is lost to another time.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn F.

    Read as a kid - pretty scary. I remember wondering why the teacher was so skinny and then later learned at that time teacher's were more on a starvation salary than now.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Linds

    Interesting. I like the gothic old fashioned atmosphere and language.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    My book club read this for October. I'm not sure I've ever read it all the way through before, and now that I have I'm still not sure why it's such a classic. I guess tales of ghosts and pathetically maladroit schoomasters made a far greater impression on people in the 19th century. Also, it seems to me that people take a lot more out of the story than is actually in there. In which case, Irving has done a tremendous thing by creating tale that we all personalize to some extend.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Yodamom

    Audio- fun and spooky in audio. A short quick clasic

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    I didn't really LOVE the story but Irving is so decriptive that I really enjoyed reading it. It made me want to read some of his other short stories.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    With detailed and vivid artwork throughout along with the classic paranormal story, this graphic novel is really amazing.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mira Sukov

    Fantástica historia de terror con una ambientación soberbia. También ha sido llevada a la gran pantalla y recientemente hay una serie de televisión. Todas las versiones son buenas, pero la obra original es imprescindible

  17. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    Pretty good for a story written over a hundred years ago. It's a good book to do a comparison unit with middle school or upper elementary students comparing it to "The Legend of Decimus Croome: A Halloween Carol."

  18. 4 out of 5

    Methia reeves

    The afterward by Charles L. Grant is what freaked me out most!!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mónica Roberts

    Muy bonita historia aunque ya la conocía de la película

  20. 5 out of 5

    Monserrate

    A well written book. Enjoyed reading it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jace

    I have to start out by saying that "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" is probably my favorite short-story (narrowly beating out Vonnegut's "More Stately Mansions") and also my favorite tale of horror (aside from that one where "the call is coming from inside the house!"), so I was extremely excited when I learned that someone had translated this story into graphic novelette format. To me, this was one of the rare occassions where the writing and the illustration are both equally superb. I find that f I have to start out by saying that "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" is probably my favorite short-story (narrowly beating out Vonnegut's "More Stately Mansions") and also my favorite tale of horror (aside from that one where "the call is coming from inside the house!"), so I was extremely excited when I learned that someone had translated this story into graphic novelette format. To me, this was one of the rare occassions where the writing and the illustration are both equally superb. I find that far too many recent graphic novels are lacking in at least one of these areas, but I found myself transfixed by both the arts and letters in this book. The story is a faithful adaptation of Irving's work; it's hard to go wrong when you use the original author's words. I have read reviews which bemoan the lack of dialogue and speech bubbles, but they would have felt out of place, especially considering that Irving's short story was entirely narration with no dialogue. I think it would have been a mistake to attempt to invent new dialogue (and recreate an old dialect of speech), when the original author deemed it unncessary. Bo Hampton does a magnificent job of selecting just the right amount of detailed narration so that the story is carried along in full without being bogged down by too much text. The end of the tale presents us with a few different scenarios and reinforces the mystery surrounding the fate of Ichabod Crane. Bo Hampton's art is on par with Irving's classic tale. His watercolors are incredibly detailed, without the harshness of too many pen lines. The lack out dark inking gives the story a hazy, dreamy, magical feel which is the perfect complement to a ghost story set in a sleepy hamlet. I felt myself drawn to his artwork and eyed the panels long after I had read the text, especially the night scenes, where gnarled tree limbs cast impish shadows across the page. Prior to reading this book I was not familiar with Hampton's work, but I have added him to my list of artists to look out for. The character design of Ichabod Crane is clearly based on the old Disney cartoon of the same name, though I'm still not sure whether this was subconscious influence, artistic homage, or downright copying. Anyone who has seen the Disney version will immediately recognize Crane's bony frame, hooked nose, pony-tail-with-bow, and three-cornered hat. I mention these similarities because they are obvious, but not because they detract from the experience. In fact, I watched that film so much as a child that when I think of Ichabod Crane, the Disney version is what pops into my head. The Ichabod character is just about the only thing in the novel that it Disneyfied; in fact Hampton's introduction stresses that at the climax of the story, the Headless Horseman throws his decaying head, not a laughing pumpking, at Crane. (Washington Irving purists will be glad to hear this...if such creatures truly exist.) In conclusion, I think Hampton knocked this one out of the park. To use another sports metaphor, this is a graphic novel which is running on all cylinders. Although I originally read a library copy, I will be purchasing a copy of my own, to be read every year on Halloween night. If you're a "Sleepy Hollow" fan or just someone who appreciates a good graphic novel, I suggest you do the same.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Czarny Pies

    Europeans who wish to better understand the United States must at some point read a collection of Washington Irving Tales as it was this Yankee of the first half of then nineteenth century not Walt Disney who created the American pop culture that the world today now knows. Irving's characters where all descendants of the dutch founders of Nieuw-Nederland that later became the state of New York. It is because of the popularity of Irving's Father Knickerbocker that today's residents of the Big Appl Europeans who wish to better understand the United States must at some point read a collection of Washington Irving Tales as it was this Yankee of the first half of then nineteenth century not Walt Disney who created the American pop culture that the world today now knows. Irving's characters where all descendants of the dutch founders of Nieuw-Nederland that later became the state of New York. It is because of the popularity of Irving's Father Knickerbocker that today's residents of the Big Apple are referred to as Knickerbockers. Irving however wrote not only tales about the city but also the Dutch in the rural areas of which none of which is more popular than the Legend of Sleepy Hollow in which Abraham Von Brunt a good young New Netherlander must deal with the unwanted competition of the pedantic New Englander Ichabod Crane for the heart of the lovely Katrina Van Tassel. Fortunately, headless Hessian horseman of local legend intervenes on behalf of the handsome Von Brunt who wins the hand of the lovely Van Tassel. European readers also need to know that that Washington Irving's greatest accomplishment was his invention of the modern Christmas. Being a noted folklore expert, the New York retailers hired him as a consultant in their plan to establish a day for the purchase of gifts close to New Year's day. Because January 1 had already established itself as a festival of public drunkenness for the city's Irish, it was ruled out. Similarly Saint Nicholas Day, which was the date in Europe for gift giving, was unacceptable because it fell on December 6 which was too far ahead of January 1st. Irving proposed December 25 which was initially rejected because Christmas did not appear in the Bible and was recognized by the Protestant majority in New York and New England to be a papal abomination. Washington Irving then proposed the solution that worked. First, St. Nicholas Day would be moved to December 25 so as to dispense with the overly Catholic Virgin Mary. Next to give the date a native New York feel, the name for St. Nicholas in Dutch "Sinter Klaus" would be used. Sinter Klaus was then modified to Santa Claus. Irving's concept proved to be successful beyond anyone's wildest hopes. It continues to spread throughout the world. It is well worth reading a set of Washington Irving Tales in order to obtain a good understanding of the innovative genius and great American author.

  23. 5 out of 5

    LitAddictedBrit

    When I first bought my eReader, I was offered 100 free eBooks and a couple of links to sites like Project Gutenberg, where you can download the 'classics' for free. This one caught my eye because I remember going to see the film adaptation when I was younger and being petrified. I thought it would be a suitable bite-size read (at only 30-something pages) for the month of Hallowe'en. As is often the case, this original story published in 1820 bears very little resemblance to the film it became. It When I first bought my eReader, I was offered 100 free eBooks and a couple of links to sites like Project Gutenberg, where you can download the 'classics' for free. This one caught my eye because I remember going to see the film adaptation when I was younger and being petrified. I thought it would be a suitable bite-size read (at only 30-something pages) for the month of Hallowe'en. As is often the case, this original story published in 1820 bears very little resemblance to the film it became. It is set in around 1790 in a Dutch settlement known as 'Tarry Town' where the inhabitants are extremely superstitious, believing most of all in the Headless Horseman, the ghost of a Hessian trooper whose head was shot off by a stray cannonball during the American Revolutionary War. The ghost now, allegedly of course, haunts the site looking for his head. Ichabod Crane is the character who unwittingly crosses paths with this phantom, after spending the evening trying to charm the beautiful daughter of a rich farmer. The description in this story is superb and the atmosphere of the settlement created at the beginning is one of the most charming I remember reading. Irving leaves nothing to chance - I don't think a passage goes by where the reader isn't painted a clear picture - it really is almost artistic! Considering that this is rumoured to be one of the earliest examples of American writing still read today, it's fantastically accessible. The turns of phrase and "old-fashioned" preoccupations like your horse-riding stance, for example, rather than seeming remote just evoke a wonderful sense of history and a more innocent time. This story won't chill you right to the bone but it might give you goosebumps on a dark night - Ichabod's encounter with the ghost (or is it...?) is fast-paced and a good climax to the tale. Overall: Best devoured in one sitting, this is nothing like the blood bath of the film (aside from the names of characters...) and well worth the short while you'll spend on it!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    There is a reason some stories stand the test of time. No matter when they were written and no matter when they are read, they are good. Washington Irving's The Legend of Sleepy Hollow is one of the earliest and greatest American classics. It appeals to the reader's tendendency, even desire, to want to believe in the supernatural as well as basic human fears. Could the headless horseman really exist? No, you say? Perhaps your emotions would betray you if you were alone, on foot, in an isolated w There is a reason some stories stand the test of time. No matter when they were written and no matter when they are read, they are good. Washington Irving's The Legend of Sleepy Hollow is one of the earliest and greatest American classics. It appeals to the reader's tendendency, even desire, to want to believe in the supernatural as well as basic human fears. Could the headless horseman really exist? No, you say? Perhaps your emotions would betray you if you were alone, on foot, in an isolated wood well after the sun had gone down. Now transport yourself back in time to the late 18th or early 19th century when mystery and myth ruled. This is exactly the moment in time that Irving captures in his writing with such alacrity that nearly two hundred years later the reader is drawn backward two centuries and given over to its fears and ignorance. This book is a must read for anyone. The author verbally paints a picture with clarity and ease. The reader is then free to visualize and "see" the story as it unfolds. Iriving nearly puts you in the middle of the action. In the story's climactic scene when Ichabot Crane is racing across the church bridge the escape the headless horseman you feel as though you are there, shouting ecnouragement to Crane but knowing he will be caught. You hear the horses hooves, the rustling leaves, the flowing stream. Irving is a masterful storyteller. Indeed, throughout, the story is replete with vivid descriptions of Ichabod Crane, Tarry Town, the graveyars, Katrina Van Tassel, and Bram Bones. As a reader you feel you know these people and places. Perhaps the only major weakness of the story is the conclusion. Not the climax, but the explanation of the final disposition of Ichabod Crane. That Bram Bones is a sly one.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    Sleepy Hollow is a small town in New York, inhabited by Dutch settlers. Ichabod Crane is the superstitious village schoolteacher. Ichabod is trying to win the hand of Katrina Van Tassel, a beautiful eighteen-year-old girl in the village. When Ichabod leaves a party he attended at the Van Tassel estate, he is chased by a mysterious headless horseman on the lonely road leading to his house. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow is a short story that pretty much everyone is familiar with but not very many peo Sleepy Hollow is a small town in New York, inhabited by Dutch settlers. Ichabod Crane is the superstitious village schoolteacher. Ichabod is trying to win the hand of Katrina Van Tassel, a beautiful eighteen-year-old girl in the village. When Ichabod leaves a party he attended at the Van Tassel estate, he is chased by a mysterious headless horseman on the lonely road leading to his house. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow is a short story that pretty much everyone is familiar with but not very many people have actually read. I’ve seen the Disney version, the Wishbone episode and the 1999 film with Johnny Depp. However, I’d never read the book (which I happened to own.) This Halloween, I thought I would finally give The Legend of Sleepy Hollow a try. I was surprised to find wit and humor in this book, especially concerning Ichabod (who I still picture as looking like he did in the Disney cartoon.) Irving’s prose is a bit wordy, but I liked his writing overall, especially some of the descriptions of animals and plants. He did a very good job at painting a picture of a sleepy little town. The story is fairly simple, unlike the Tim Burton film. Ichabod leaves a party late at night, and is chased by a headless horseman. Ichabod is never found. I loved how we never know exactly what happened. Overall, it was a creepy ghost story that is perfect for Halloween. 4/5

  26. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. As a fan of Sleepy Hollow (or should I say- The Hessian)- I actually didn't read the story until fairly recently. Before I had only ever seen the Disney movie and the Tim Burton Movie. Since I have a Hessian fansite I figured I should at least make the effort to read the original story by Washington Irving. I did like the story, but in my opinion it just didn't grab me as much as Tim Burtons movie. The characters just seemed to really annoy me in the book, Katrina came across as a brattish whore, B As a fan of Sleepy Hollow (or should I say- The Hessian)- I actually didn't read the story until fairly recently. Before I had only ever seen the Disney movie and the Tim Burton Movie. Since I have a Hessian fansite I figured I should at least make the effort to read the original story by Washington Irving. I did like the story, but in my opinion it just didn't grab me as much as Tim Burtons movie. The characters just seemed to really annoy me in the book, Katrina came across as a brattish whore, Brom Bones was just the typical bragging macho guy who you just wanted to see get killed (10 points to Mr Burton!) and Ichabod, oh my Lord-What a horrible cowardly man he is!. Even the horseman weren't really scary or interesting. In Tim Burtons version the backstory of the horseman is more clear, the character is more well out there, more interesting if that makes sense, wheras in the book he's not really mentioned too much besides the drunken ramblings of SH villagers. And in the end it leaves you wondering if there really is a horseman, it was more likely that it were just Brom dressed up to scare Ichabod who he was annoyed at cos he fancied Katrina. and hell Ichabod was a real pansy anyway so probably just fled. Respect to the man (Washington) for writing a story which inspired several sequels, I know you all may hate me for this but- I think i'll stick with Tim Burtons movie.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    Sleepy Hollow is a tiny Dutch community tucked away in the New York countryside not long after the Revolution. It is in this classic short story we are first introduced to two character who have thoroughly captured our darkest imagination, Ichabod Crane and the Headless Horseman. This story has been told and retold innumerable times, but in it's original form it is nothing more than a ghost story told to frighten young children. Ichabod Crane is the local school teacher, fascinated in equal part Sleepy Hollow is a tiny Dutch community tucked away in the New York countryside not long after the Revolution. It is in this classic short story we are first introduced to two character who have thoroughly captured our darkest imagination, Ichabod Crane and the Headless Horseman. This story has been told and retold innumerable times, but in it's original form it is nothing more than a ghost story told to frighten young children. Ichabod Crane is the local school teacher, fascinated in equal parts by superstition, food, and one Katrina Von Tassel. One late night, following the Von Tassel's annual Halloween party, a night of good food and frightful stories, a dejected Ichabod Crane rides home at the witching hour. It is here that he meets the subject of so many local legends, the Headless Horseman. I was sadly disappointed by this short story. Most of the pages were taken up with descriptions of the farmland and arguably one of the most well-known fictional schoolteachers of American literature. The language used was beautiful and the descriptions of the land painted a perfect picture of rural life in the late eighteenth century. However, this classic horror was more than a little short of plot. The action takes place in a few very short pages and sadly did not build up the suspense properly. This is one time when I can honestly say that the filmmaker's imagination has succeeded in many ways where the written word unfortunately could not deliver.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Many have seen some tv or movie variation of this story and are familiar with the storyline. I had read it in school and even watched the movie Legend of Sleepy Hollow that came out. I liked the movie, but there is always something about a good story that always beats out the movie especially when it comes to a mystery or scary story. The story is set in 1790 in a place called Tarry Town that is in a glen called Sleepy Hollow. We meet Ichabod Crane who is a schoolmaster and who wants to marry an Many have seen some tv or movie variation of this story and are familiar with the storyline. I had read it in school and even watched the movie Legend of Sleepy Hollow that came out. I liked the movie, but there is always something about a good story that always beats out the movie especially when it comes to a mystery or scary story. The story is set in 1790 in a place called Tarry Town that is in a glen called Sleepy Hollow. We meet Ichabod Crane who is a schoolmaster and who wants to marry an 18 yr old wealthy farmers daughter, Katrina Van Tassel. However, he has some competition with Abraham Van Brunt who also wants her hand. One night there is a party where all are in attendence. When Ichabod leaves he finds he is pursued by the Headless Horseman. He is the ghost of a Hessian trooper who had his head shot off by a stray cannonball during a "nameless battle" during the American Revolutionary War. Ichabod mysteriously disappears from town after that fateful night which leaves Katrina to marry Brom Bones. The story leaves in mystery saying only that Brom would look "exceedingly knowing when the story of Ichabod was related". This is a fun story that is wrapped in love, mystery, and legend. Definitely worth the read and being free what could be better!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sorcha

    Listened to the free Librivox recording, and the narrator was well suited to the story. I've always meant to read this and I'm not sure what I was expecting to happen. I thought that perhaps the headless horseman appeared more often, but this was pitched just right. In Sleepy Hollow, not long after the War of Independance, when many lives were lost, ghost stories have been built up around what happened. Ichibod Crane, the school teacher, has been courting one of the local women, much to the disma Listened to the free Librivox recording, and the narrator was well suited to the story. I've always meant to read this and I'm not sure what I was expecting to happen. I thought that perhaps the headless horseman appeared more often, but this was pitched just right. In Sleepy Hollow, not long after the War of Independance, when many lives were lost, ghost stories have been built up around what happened. Ichibod Crane, the school teacher, has been courting one of the local women, much to the dismay of others who would like to also court her. He has become aware of the local war stories - both the British and the Americans can past nearby - and these stories are repeated at a local party thrown by the father of his beau. Once the party finishes, he stays behind to talk to the girl but gets turfed out with a flea in his ear not long after - Irving not going into detail. He has to ride his horse through the haunted area, only to be chased by the headless horseman. Crane is never to be seen again, and rumours abound for a while about what happened and whether he is still alive Good haunting story, and well suited for a reading on a dark and stormy night.....

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bruce

    Irving sets a dreamy and mysterious stage for this tale of the early Dutch in the Hudson River valley. His ability to create a mood of somnolence and suspension of time is uncanny and beguiling. Irving, in creating this mood, sets up a skillful contrast between the indolent and seductive past and the hurrying future, a contrast that he intends to explore and exploit in this, as in so many of, his stories. Ichabod Crane is the figure of the intellectual, the impractical man of the past, while Bro Irving sets a dreamy and mysterious stage for this tale of the early Dutch in the Hudson River valley. His ability to create a mood of somnolence and suspension of time is uncanny and beguiling. Irving, in creating this mood, sets up a skillful contrast between the indolent and seductive past and the hurrying future, a contrast that he intends to explore and exploit in this, as in so many of, his stories. Ichabod Crane is the figure of the intellectual, the impractical man of the past, while Brom Bones is the up and coming, roistering new American, Whitmanesque in character. Irving’s sympathies seem to lie with the former, even in his defeat. This delightful and familiar short story is a model for the America coming into being in the early 19th century, an America that Irving view with, at best, ambivalence, but a model that has become a part of our national mythology, reflecting our view of ourselves.

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